Poetry – How to Write a Diamond Poem

Diamond Poetry

Marbles
Smooth, Glossy
Rolling, Moving, Scoring
Games, Fun, Bouncer, Players
Swirling, Twirling, Spinning
Round, Circular
Sphere

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If you would like to try writing a diamond poem, follow these rules

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Line 2 – Two adjectives describing the noun on line one.

Line 3 – Three verbs that end in -ing. They tell what the noun in line one does.

Line 4 – Four nouns that go with the noun in line one.

Line 5 – Three verbs that end in -ing. They tell what the noun in line four does

Line 6 – Two adjectives describing the noun on line seven.

Line 7 – A noun that means the same as line one.

HERE is a great guide for writing all kinds of diamond poems (includes examples)

Try THIS site for an easy “fill in the blanks” poem.

Click HERE for a great step by step diamond poem creator. You can publish and print your finished product.

Poetry Portfolio and SS Test

It’s that time of year when we wrap things up and get ready to say goodbye. Look here to keep track of when you final assessments will be.

English – Poetry Portfolio

  • Due Thursday 6/6/13 for Day 1 (D block)
  • Due Friday 7/6/13 for Day 2 (F block)

Poetry Portfolio Directions 2013

Social Studies – Middle Ages + Catherine, Called Birdy Test

  • Tuesday 4/6/13 for Day 1 (A block)
  • Wednesday 5/6/13 for Day 2 (E block)

BLACK  DEATH  DAY will be on Thursday and Friday in Social Studies. Wear Black!


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Poetry – How to Write a Sonnet

shakespeareWhat Is a Sonnet?

A sonnet is a poem that consists of 14 lines, follows a specific rhyming pattern, and each line should consist of ten syllables.

The 14 lines of a sonnet can be broken down into three quatrains and an ending couplet (two rhyming lines).

Sonnets should be written with one clear theme.

Part 1 – quatrain

  • Lines 1-4 make up the first quatrain. (4 lines)
  • These four lines should establish the subject of the poem.
  • The rhyming pattern for these four lines is ABAB.

Part 2 – quatrain

  • Lines 5-8 make up the first quatrain. (4 lines)
  • These four lines should state the theme of the poem.
  • The rhyming pattern for these four lines is CDCD.

Part 3 – quatrain

  • Lines 9-12 make up the first quatrain. (4 lines)
  • These four lines should support the theme of the poem.
  • The rhyming pattern for these four lines is EFEF.

Part 4 – couplet

  • Lines 13 and 14 are a rhyming couplet (2 lines)
  • These last two lines conclude the poem.
  • The rhyming pattern for these two lines is GG

Now you try! Follow these basic steps:

  1. Choose a topic that you would like to write about.
  2. Using the proper rhyme pattern, state your theme in a metaphor. (Lines 1-4)
  3. Using the proper rhyme pattern, support your theme. (Lines 5-12)
  4. Using the proper rhyme pattern, conclude your theme. (Lines 13 and 14)
This guide can help – William Shakespeare Sonnets -guide
HERE is a how-to guide to writing sonnets.
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Here is a really funny video that helps you learn about iambic pentameter (the rhythm of a sonnet)
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Poetry – Haiku

Haiku Poems – How To Write Them

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You can ignore the Twitter part. I want you to post your Haiku to comments.

Haiku is a traditional form of Japanese poetry consisting of three lines.haiku

Haikus go like this.
First you write five syllables,
then seven, then five.

Here is a classic:

Haikus are easy
But sometimes they don’t make sense

Refrigerator

What is a syllable?

A syllable is a unit of pronunciation having one vowel sound, with or without surrounding consonants, forming the whole or a part of a word; e.g., there are two syllables in water and three in inferno.

The word “Haiku” has two syllables:  Hai-ku; the word “introduction” has four syllables:  in-tro-duc-tion.

This site may (or may not) help.

Homework:

Now you try. Write some Haiku and post them in comments before next class. Remember to follow the rules of the poem, AND create a mood, emotion, or feeling with your poem.

Challenge: try to write at least one Haiku about the Middle Ages or Catherine, Called Birdy.

Poetry Slam Prep

It’s final prep time for your slam poem. Click on the link below, watch the video, and TED-Ed Slam Poetryfollow the lesson. Your responses will count as a HW grade.

TED-Ed Slam Poetry

After the video, it’s time to read your poem aloud. I mean ALOUD! Find a space and let it rip! Make edits as necessary, make revisions, trim the fat, but make sure you keep the heart and soul of your poem. Now read it ALOUD again. Repeat these steps as many times as is necessary.

Memorize your poem. You can have a printed copy (make the font large enough to easily read) in front of you if you wish.

Remember: Rhythm, Rhyme, Repetition, PIPES, and PASSION!

Your poem should be 1-2 minutes long, as it is presented. Practice and see how long yours is.

PRESENTATIONS:

Thursday – D Block (Eng. 1)

Friday – F Block (Eng. 2)

Poetry – How to Write an Acrostic Poem

acrostic-poem

Acrostic poems are one of the easiest to write. Select a topic, then think of a key word (or group of words) related to that topic and write it vertically. Add phrases or sentences to each letter to develop your poem.  Try the acrostic poem helper below if you need some help.

How to Write an Acrostic Poem

Great EASY Acrostic Poem Creator

* Each line should be a phrase or sentence!

Acrostic poems seem easy at first, but looks can be deceiving. You must really take your time and choose powerful words. Avoid overused words (dead words) like nicebad, or awesome . Instead, try for strong words like breathtakinghorrific, or glorious.

Capture the heart of your topic!

Post your acrostic in the comments. Table points if everyone at your table posts by NEXT ENGLISH CLASS.

Here’s an example:

Catherine, Called Birdy

A knight’s daughter

Trapped like a bird in a gilded cage

Her fate sealed

Expectations thrust upon her

Rebelling against them

In time realization dawns

New understanding comes at last

Eventually learning to free her mind

Poetry – Slam Poem

SLAM poetry is all about in voicing problems and offering hope. Whatever you write about, you should feel passionate about. The three main elements of a good SLAM poem are:taylor mali

1. Rhythm—Even though SLAM poetry is written in free verse (no rules), it has a definite driving rhythm, but not a regular rhythm like in limericks. The rhythm is more closely related to the free verse rhythm that keeps the poem moving from one line to the next.

2. Repetition—SLAM poetry uses repetition like a wheel uses a hub and all the spokes link in the hub. SLAM poets return the same word or phrase multiple times with in the poem to keep the reader returning time and again to the central focus.

3. Rhyme—While there is not a specific rhyme scheme, like in limerick, the rhyme in SLAM poetry is used to direct the readers ear toward a particular idea or theme. The entire poem is never rhyming. Rhyme is used in delicate balance with rhythm and repetition as a tool for the poet.

How to Write a SLAM poem…

  • First, start with a cause! What are you angry about, or what do you love? What needs change in your world? What moves you deeply as person? Start with those issues that you want to address.
  • Next, make a word bank of important words that you want to include in your poem. Listen to how the words and phrases sound. Are there any that you could hinge your poem around?
  • Finally, start writing! Say your words aloud to hear them. After all, it is going to be read aloud!

For some more great tips, look here. You may not get all of it, but what you do get will be extremely useful.